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Metal Fridge Magnet: France. Carcassonne (Plate Shaped, Silver Color)

Metal Fridge Magnet: France. Carcassonne (Plate Shaped, Silver Color)
Out Of Stock
Metal Fridge Magnet: France. Carcassonne (Plate Shaped, Silver Color)
US$5.99
Sin impuestos: US$5.99
Precio en puntos fidelidad: 599
  • Stock: Out Of Stock
  • Peso: 60.00g
  • Las dimensiones: 8.00mm x 70.00mm x 70.00mm
  • SKU: 00004930

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Description

Carcassonne In France

This is a plate shaped, silver coloured, metal fridge magnet souvenir depicting Carcassonne in France. Carcassonne is a fortified French town in the Aude department. It is divided into the fortified Cite de Carcassonne and the more expansive lower city, the ville basse. Carcassone was founded by the Visigoths in the fifth century, though the Romans had fortified the settlement earlier. The fortress, which was thoroughly restored in 1853 by the theorist and architect Eugene Viollet-le-Duc, was added to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1997. Carcassonne was struck off the roster of official fortifications under Napoleon and the Restoration, and the fortified cite of Carcassonne fell into such disrepair that the French government decided that it should be demolished. A decree to that effect that was made official in 1849 caused an uproar. The antiquary and mayor of Carcassonne, Jean-Pierre Cros-Mayrevieille, and the writer Prosper Merimee, the first inspector of ancient monuments, led a campaign to preserve the fortress as a historical monument. Later in the year the architect Eugene Viollet-le-Duc, already at work restoring the Basilica of Saint-Nazaire, was commissioned to renovate the place.

Restoration Of Carcassone

In 1853, works began with the west and southwest walling, followed by the towers of the porte Narbonnaise and the principal entrance to the cite. The fortifications were consolidated here and there, but the chief attention was paid to restoring the roofing of the towers and the ramparts, where Viollet-le-Duc ordered the destruction of structures that had encroached against the walls, some of them of considerable age. Viollet-le-Duc left copious notes and drawings on his death in 1879, when his pupil Paul Boeswillwald, and later the architect Nodet continued the rehabilitation of Carcassonne. The restoration was strongly criticized during Viollet-le-Duc's lifetime. Fresh from work in the north of France, he made the error of using slates and restoring the roofs as point-free environment. Yet, overall, Viollet-le-Duc's achievement at Carcassonne is agreed to be a work of genius, though not of the strictest authenticity. The newer part (Ville Basse) of the city on the other side of the Aude river (which dates back from the Middle Ages, created after the crusade) manufactures shoes, rubber and textiles. A major part of its income, however, comes from the tourism connected to the fortifications (Cite) and from boat cruising on the Canal du Midi. Carcassonne receives about three million visitors annually.

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