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Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv

Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Israel. Tel Aviv
US$3.29
Sin impuestos: US$3.29
Precio en puntos fidelidad: 329
  • Stock: En Stock
  • Peso: 21.00g
  • Las dimensiones: 6.00mm x 77.00mm x 52.00mm
  • SKU: 00004477

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Description

Acrylic Fridge Magnet of Tel Aviv, Israel

This is an acrylic fridge magnet souvenir depicting Tel Aviv in Israel. Tel Aviv has a population of 410,000 making it the second largest city in Israel. It is located on the Israeli Mediterranean coastline in central-west Israel. Residents of Tel Aviv are referred to as Tel Avivim. As the United Nations and most countries do not recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, Tel Aviv is home to most foreign embassies. Tel Aviv's White City, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003, comprises the world's largest concentration of Bauhaus buildings. Tel Aviv is an economic hub, home to the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange, corporate offices and research and development centers. It is the country's financial capital and a major performing arts and business center. Tel Aviv has the second-largest economy in the Middle East after Dubai, and is the 31st most expensive city in the world. With 2.5 million international visitors annually, Tel Aviv is the fifth-most-visited city in the Middle East and Africa.

A Troubled Past

Napoleon besieged the city in 1799 and killed scores of inhabitants; a plague followed, decimating the remaining population. The port of Jaffa began to grow as an urban center in the early 18th century, when the Ottoman government in Istanbul intervened to guard the port and reduce attacks by Bedouins and pirates. From 1800 to 1870, many of the port's old walls and towers were torn down to allow for expansion. The sea wall, 2.5 metres (8.2 ft) high, remained intact until the 1930s, when it was built over during a renovation of the port by the British Mandatory authorities. During the mid-19th century, the city grew prosperous from trade with Europe, especially in silk and oranges. By 1882, the Jewish population had reached more than 1,500. The new arrivals were motivated more by Zionism than religion and came to farm the land and engage in productive labor.

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