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Tuvalu

SKU: 00001135 Stock: In Stock
Acrylic Fridge Magnet with a Picture of Funafuti Island, Tuvalu If pictures could ooze an air of peacefulness, this fridge magnet with an image of the Funafuti Island would be the number one pick. Not only does the picture show a waterscape of the island, it is a perfect reflection of the serenity o..
US$3.29
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Souvenirs from Tuvalu

The lucky visitors to the island nation of Tuvalu report back of pristine beaches, untouched coral reefs and gentle days spent in the sun. Tuvaluan souvenirs are a beautiful way to remember the time spent in this tropical paradise, as you flip through photographic post cards, shuffle imprinted key chains, and admire your refrigerator magnet every time you enjoy a snack. Special commemorative stamps of international political and popular figure are a special souvenir from Tuvalu. For something more organic, shell necklaces and fo, necklaces of woven pandanus leaves, are ways to adorn yourself in oceanic style. Woven trays, fans and baskets are perfect for home organization, and wood carvings of local deities and animals can be placed for dramatic effect in an office. Sportsmen might appreciate a carved wooden fish hook, both utilitarian and pleasing to look at. Large shells are turned into ashtrays and trinket holders, ideal for adding a touch of the sea to a counter.

History of Tuvalu

Midway between Australia and the Hawaiian Islands, Tuvalu is an archipelago, consisting of 5 atolls and 4 reef islands. Its small population of just over 10,500 makes it the third least populated nation on the planet, and the 4th smallest in terms of landmass, at only 26 sq. km. The island was originally inhabited by Polynesians, and existed quietly until the 1800's, when they became a British protectorate and renamed Tuvalu and its neighbors the Ellice Islands. The islands filed for a change in status to dependency, which separated it from the other islands, and was recognized as an independent Commonwealth in 1978. Tuvalu became a member of the United Nations on September 5th, 2000. The country still enjoys relative isolation, with the only access via the ocean. In fact, if a tourist from a cruise ship misses the departure time for their boat, they may be left on the island for 2 weeks.

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