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Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue

Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma State Capitol. As Long As Waters Flow Statue
US$3.29
Ex Tax: US$3.29
Price in reward points: 329
  • Stock: In Stock
  • Weight: 20.00g
  • Dimensions: 5.00mm x 65.00mm x 65.00mm
  • SKU: 00005441

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Licence

The author of the photo: Serge Melki. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0).

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Description

As long as waters flow statue in the Capitol of Oklahoma

This is an acrylic fridge magnet souvenir of the As long as waters flow statue in the Capitol of Oklahoma. Allan Houser's monumental tribute to Native Americans, As Long as the Waters Flow, was dedicated on June 4, 1989. The traditional elements of the dedication held true to the powerful meaning of legacy within the statue. As Long as the Waters Flow refers to President Andrew Jackson's vow to Native Americans that they shall possess their land "as long as the grass grows and the rivers run." The 13-foot, 6-inch bronze statue exudes Houser's artistic style. Lacking intricate representative detailing, the large solid planes among the surface denote strength within an everlasting presence. Her traditional attire is complete with an eagle feather fan, which is considered a sacred symbol among Native American cultures. Allan Houser married Anna Marie Gallegos in 1939, and together with three young sons they moved to Los Angeles in 1941 where Allan sought employment during the war effort.

Inspired by Henry Moore

It was here that Allan would have the opportunity to visit museum exhibitions of European modernists such as Brancusi, Arp, Lipschitz, and Henry Moore, whose work would have a lasting influence on Allan as his own style evolved in the succeeding decades. In 1962 Allan was asked to join the faculty of the newly created Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe. There he created the sculpture department and began focusing his own artistic output on three-dimensional work. As he taught and created sculpture he began integrating the aesthetics of the modernists with his narrative ideas. By the late 1960's he began exhibiting this sculpture and recognition of his unique style grew. Museums and private collectors sought out examples, and his influence became apparent on hundreds of students and other artists. In 1975 Allan retired from teaching to devote himself full-time to his own work. In the two following decades he would produce close to 1,000 sculptures in stone, wood, and bronze, and emerged as a major figure on an international scale. He had nearly 50 solo exhibitions in museums and galleries in the United States, Europe, and Asia, and he continued working tirelessly until his death on August 22, 1994.

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