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Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa

Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: United States. Oklahoma. Boston Avenue Methodist Church, Downtown Tulsa
US$3.29
Ex Tax: US$3.29
Price in reward points: 329
  • Stock: In Stock
  • Weight: 21.00g
  • Dimensions: 6.00mm x 52.00mm x 77.00mm
  • SKU: 00005438

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Licence

The author of the photo: Jill Reed. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0).

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Description

Methodist Church Downtown, Tulsa Oklahoma

This is an acrylic fridge magnet souvenir of Methodist Church Downtown, Tulsa Oklahoma, United States. The Boston Avenue United Methodist Church, located in downtown Tulsa, Oklahoma and completed in 1929, is considered to be one of the finest examples of ecclesiastical Art Deco architecture in the United States, and has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Built by a congregation of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, it was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1999. The design of the US$1.25 million edifice is credited to two individuals: Adah Robinson and Bruce Goff. The original building consisted of a semicircular auditorium, a soaring 225-foot (68.5 m) tower, and a wing containing class rooms. The soaring straight lines of the tower provide physical, visual, and philosophical linkage to the Gothic Cathedrals of past ages as well as allowing the designers to indulge in the Art Deco celebration of the vertical.

Tower detail

At the top of the tower, as well as on many of the other high points and used much in the same manner that churches in the Middle Ages utilized crockets and finials, is a stylized sculpture that represents two hands raised upward in prayer. This motif of praying hands is one that is echoed throughout the building and is one of the areas of design that can be traced back to the early drawings by Robinson. While the building is in many ways unique, the idea of the large, semi-circular main auditorium has an earlier precursor in another Methodist church, Louis Sullivan's St. Paul's Methodist Church, designed in 1910 and built, somewhat modified, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa in 1914. Like many Art Deco buildings the Boston Avenue Church reveled in the use of various building materials, so metal, glass, terra cotta, Indiana limestone and Minnesota granite can all be found. The exterior is decorated with numerous terra cotta sculptures by the Denver sculptor, Robert Garrison, who had been a student of Adah Robinson's in Oklahoma City. These sculptures include several groups of people at prayer representing Spiritual life, Religious Education and Worship. Other places on the exterior reveal classic art deco styles organic plant designs, which. like the stained glass windows were based on designs drawn from Oklahoma flora, most notably the tritomas and coreopsis flowers.

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