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Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre

Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre
Acrylic Fridge Magnet: Tunisia. El Jem. Roman Amphitheatre
US$3.29
Ex Tax: US$3.29
Price in reward points: 329
  • Stock: In Stock
  • Weight: 21.00g
  • Dimensions: 6.00mm x 77.00mm x 52.00mm
  • SKU: 00003427

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Licence

The author of the photo: McKay Savage. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0).

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Description

Imagine the Days of Gladiators and Chariot Races

One of the largest and most important structures of the ancient world, the Roman amphitheater at El Djem may not be quite as big as the more famous Roman Colliseum, but it is better preserved and incredibly intact. Tunisia is famous for its Roman ruins, and visitors to El Djem come solely for the chance to explore the nearly two-thousand year old structure. This particular image has been depicted on a collectible magnetic photograph from Worldwide Gifts as a representative souvenir from Tunisia.

El Djem was originally built in the second century when Roman explorers and conquerors controlled much of Africa. The vast amphitheater was the sight of many gladiator battles and horse-drawn chariot races , and today is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

More Fascinating Roman Ruins in Tunisia

History and archeology lovers always enjoy exploring Tunisia because of the many well preserved and intact Roman ruins that abound in this area. Besides the fantastic amphitheater at El Djem and its accompanying museum, visitors often explore the Carthage area. Once the most powerful city in the world, there are only ruins outside modern-day Tunis to prove the existence of the city founded by the Phoenician Queen Dido in the 9th century BC and later controlled by Roman conquerors.

Some of the best Carthage ruins in Tunisia include Byrsa Hill and the Carthage National Museum. Visitors always enjoy seeing the Antonine Baths, as well as the Roman Amphitheater. You can visit the remains of Roman villas to see how people lived during these times, and the ruins of the reconstructed Roman theater are a fascinating step back in time. Although the Roman theater is more restoration than ruins, the nearby Odeon theater is completely in ruins and an interesting place to explore. You can learn a great deal about Carthage ruins at the Bardo museum.

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