Menu
Your Cart

Vinyl Fridge Magnet (18 x 10 cm): United States. California. Sequoia National Park. General Sherman Tree

Vinyl Fridge Magnet (18 x 10 cm): United States. California. Sequoia National Park. General Sherman Tree
-50 %
Vinyl Fridge Magnet (18 x 10 cm): United States. California. Sequoia National Park. General Sherman Tree
US$1.99
US$3.99
Ex Tax: US$1.99
Price in reward points: 399
  • Stock: In Stock
  • Weight: 50.00g
  • Dimensions: 1.00mm x 105.00mm x 180.00mm
  • SKU: 00003194

Like it? Share it!

Reviews

Write a review

Please login or register to review

Description

Trees You Won't Believe!

Sequoia National Park is home to some big trees. Once you see this park for yourself, you are going to want to remember how insanely large these sequoias are. That is why you will be thankful for this high-quality vinyl fridge magnet. It's a great way to acknowledge that you saw, and believe in, these behemoth trees. Amidst these tall trees, one stands out as just a little bit more awe-inspiring than the others-General Sherman. Let's delve into why General Sherman is even bigger and better than the other trees.

General Sherman Tree

The General Sherman is a giant sequoia tree located in the Giant Forest of Sequoia National Park. It is the largest known living single stem tree in the entire world. But that might mean what you think it does. General Sherman is neither the tallest known living tree on Earth (that award goes to the Hyperion tree, a Coast Redwood), nor is it the widest known living tree on Earth (a cypress tree and a baobab tree both have a greater diameter), nor is it the oldest known living tree on Earth (the Methuselah tree, a Great Basin bristlecone pine is actually the oldest living tree). General Sherman has a height of 83.8 meters, a diameter of 7.7 meters, an estimated bole volume of 1,487 cubic meters and is estimated to be between 2,300 and 2,700 years old. This makes it among the tallest, widest and oldest of all trees in the world. Where does it get its name from? It was named after American Civil War general, William Tecumseh Sherman. James Wolverton, a lieutenant in the 9th Indiana Calvary (who served under Sherman) and a naturalist, named the tree in 1879.

We use cookies and other similar technologies to improve your browsing experience and the functionality of our site. Check Privacy Policy for details.